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Overview

Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand.

This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice that you can use immediately. Experienced designers can use this guide as a sourcebook of ideas; novices will find a roadmap to the world of interface and interaction design.

  • Design engaging and usable interfaces with more confidence and less guesswork

  • Learn design concepts that are often misunderstood, such as affordances, visual hierarchy, navigational distance, and the use of color

  • Get recommendations for specific UI patterns, including alternatives and warnings on when not to use them

  • Mix and recombine UI ideas as you see fit

  • Polish the look and feel of your interfaces with graphic design principles and patterns

"Anyone who's serious about designing interfaces should have this book on their shelf for reference. It's the most comprehensive cross-platform examination of common interface patterns anywhere." --Dan Saffer, author of Designing Gestural Interfaces (O'Reilly) and Designing for Interaction (New Riders)

Subscriber Reviews

Average Rating: 4 out of 5 rating Based on 1 Rating

"Find the best solution for particular UI" - by Michal Konrad Owsiak on 06-AUG-2011
Reviewer Rating: 1 star rating2 star rating3 star rating4 star rating5 star rating
Patterns are present within IT industry for quite some time. Typically, books related to patterns application refer to particular language and present patterns either using either the language they refer to or using UML. Jenifer takes a different approach. Instead of providing reader with technology specific solution she shows how different UI related aspects can be organized and turned into reusable patterns. In first chapter, you will find description of various motives that drive users. This is the entry point for the rest of the book. How to react correctly to user’s requirements (expectations) is a leading motive of the book. Following chapters focus on various aspects of UI design (e.g. navigating, retrieving user’s input, presenting data, listing data). What is worth mentioning here is that Jenifer doesn’t bind solutions to a particular technology or operating system. She tries to diversify and cover most common user environments. Of course, she shows examples that are based on real applications but these are used rather as an example instead of being one and only one proper solution.

What I like in the book is the way Jenifer presents the patterns. She goes with them, one by one, using structured schema: what will be covered by particular pattern, when is it used, why is it used, how should you use it, how does it look like (by example), and the reference to other sources mentioning given pattern. In general, this is good book, however I think that some conclusions are not solidly proven (especially related to user’s behavior). On the other hand, UI efficiency is not something that you can easily prove.

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Visit the catalog page for Designing Interfaces, 2nd Edition

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Visit the errata page for Designing Interfaces, 2nd Edition

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