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Technique Number 1: The Surprise Visit > Technique Number 1: The Surprise Visit - Pg. 115

C ha pt e r 6 Ac countability Techniques for D r iv in g R e s u lts 115 that, and I would be sure to let the manager know it, but always in a respectful way. Before I would even leave the store, accounts of my visit would begin to spread like wildfire. Soon, every store manager began to think, "I wonder if he will show up here unannounced." There is something about knowing that at all times you are expected to give your best that breeds a culture of accountability such that it soon becomes a way of life and the norm. This also ties in to our previous discussion of integ- rity and how we defined it as doing the right thing even when no one is looking. Working as if your boss could step through the door at any moment will always reflect a focused, dedicated effort. Before I go any further, I want to make something very clear. Surprise visits are not an attempt to play a sick management game called "gotcha!" You're not snooping around in the hopes of finding your employees screwing up. Instead, your heartfelt motivation is that you'll be able to "catch them doing it right" and be able to commend them for their integrity and accountability. The surprise visit is also a great technique that managers can use to roll up their sleeves and demonstrate to their employees what's impor- tant in the field. When you find something that needs correction, your visit becomes the start of corrective feedback. If you find something positive (like I did in the Long Island call center example in Chapter 5), it becomes an opportunity for recognition of a job well done. In the previous chapter, I presented an example of a manager who was not accountable and of another one who was totally accountable. There is something about knowing that at all times you are expected to give your best that breeds a culture of accountability such that it soon becomes a way of life and the norm.