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5.3.3. Compound verbs > 5.3.3.1. Prepositional and phrasal verbs - Pg. 131

110 CHAPTER 5 The building blocks of natural language rule statements 3. Adjectives or past participles can be used after the verb `be', to form a phrase that behaves like an intransitive verb, as in `be present', `be available', `be excluded'. 4. Nouns, with or without a preceding article (see Section 5.4.1) can also be used with the verb `be' and a preposition, to form a phrase that behaves like a transitive verb, as in `be part of', `be a category of', `take the place of', `be a match for'. 5. Nouns can also be used after the verb `be' and a preposition, to form a phrase that behaves like an intransitive verb, as in `be on duty', `be in service'. The verb `have' can also be used with a noun and a preposition to form a phrase that behaves like a transitive verb, as in `have responsibility for'. 5.3.3.1 Prepositional and phrasal verbs Verbs (including `be', but not `have') can be used with prepositions to form prepositional verbs that behave like transitive verbs, as in `apply for', `buy into', `act as'. Similar to prepositional verbs are phrasal verbs, such as `check out', `look up'. The principal difference between prepositional and phrasal verbs is that, in a phrasal verb, the preposition can either precede or follow the object of the verb. One can check out something or check something out, look up something or look something up. `Check out' and `look up' are thus phrasal verbs. In fact, the prepositions in phrasal verbs (`out' and `up' in these examples) act as adverbs (words that qualify the meaning of a verb, such as `well' or