Free Trial

Safari Books Online is a digital library providing on-demand subscription access to thousands of learning resources.


  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Mobile DNA: Finding Treasure in Junk > 4. Mobile DNA of model organisms

4. Mobile DNA of model organisms

Model organisms have contributed greatly to our knowledge of mobile DNA. Among those organisms are various yeast species, Drosophila, worms, Arabidopsis (the mustard weed), bacteria, mouse, and rat. Mobile DNA in the mouse is discussed in a later chapter.

Mobile elements have been studied extensively in S. cerevisiae (the budding yeast), Schizosaccharomyces pombi (S. pombe, the fission yeast), and Candida albicans (the pathogenic fungus). These yeast species are extremely far apart on the evolutionary tree, meaning that they diverged from one another hundreds of millions of years ago. S. cerevisiae have a relatively small number of Ty elements that are LTR-retrotransposons. In an analysis of the yeast genome in the late 1990s, Kim et al. found 217 Ty1, 34 Ty2, 41 Ty3, 32 Ty4, and 7 Ty5 elements. Importantly, the vast majority of these elements were solo LTRs or LTR fragments. (Solo LTRs are derived from misalignment and unequal crossing over between two LTR-retrotransposons on separate chromosomal homologues or mispairing and crossing over between the two LTRs of a single LTR-retrotransposon.) Thus, of the 217 Ty1s present in the yeast genome, only about 30 are full-length (Kim et al., 1998).


  

You are currently reading a PREVIEW of this book.

                                                                                                                    

Get instant access to over $1 million worth of books and videos.

  

Start a Free Trial


  
  • Safari Books Online
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint