Free Trial

Safari Books Online is a digital library providing on-demand subscription access to thousands of learning resources.


  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

1 Colour in photography > Methods of colour reproduction

Methods of colour reproduction

Two methods of colour reproduction exist: the additive method and the subtractive method.

Additive method

James Clerk Maxwell proved the trichromatic theory in the 1850s by demonstrating with light from blue-, green- and red-filtered lanterns overlapped on one screen. Dimming or brightening individual lanterns recreated all the colours of the spectrum, while an equal mixture of the three primary colours formed a patch of white. Combination of two primary colours results in a secondary colour. This is shown in Figure 1.5(a). This type of colour mixing is called additive. Note that during the 1870s and 1880s the technique of pointillism was used by French Impressionist painters such as Monet, Pissaro and Seurat. Pointillism is the technique of juxtapositioning tiny brush strokes in paints of strong luminous colours and subtle tones. It is a significant fact that the very first colour photography materials to go on sale were manufactured in France (Lumière’s ‘Autochrome’, 1907) and worked on what is known as the additive principle. With the additive method, you can create any colour by varying the proportions and intensities of red, green and blue points in an image. When viewing an image from a distance, the eye sees a uniform colour and not individual colour points. One of the applications of this method....page 183). The colours are formed by very small red, green and blue pixels, which you can discriminate only by very close inspection of the screen. The additive method has also been used for instant picture materials and for the design of digital imaging sensors.


  

You are currently reading a PREVIEW of this book.

                                                                                                                    

Get instant access to over $1 million worth of books and videos.

  

Start a Free Trial


  
  • Safari Books Online
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint