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Chapter 10: Bridging the Digital Divide ... > APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY AND APPROPRIA... - Pg. 155

Bridging the Digital Divide by Open Source system has a modular architecture, which com- prises a kernel, a reporting module, a scholarship module, a fee module and university specific extension modules. One of the implementing universities leased a virtual Linux server from a provider in the United States for the deployment of ARIS. This allows client access from any Internet connected computer via web browser. Clients use Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer to access the appli- cation. The hardware requirements on the client side comprise a computer with connection to the Internet. All users currently run Microsoft Windows as an operating system, although this is not a requirement. This particular university has faculties in different cities in various parts of Mozambique. Each faculty has academic registry staff, which is trained both in joint workshops as well as directly on the job. The process is further facilitated with than indigenous technology and at the same time immensely cheaper than the sophisticated, highly capital-intensive technology of modern technol- ogy. He reasoned that the gap between traditional and modern technology is too big that a transition from one to the other would be possible, and the infiltration of modern technology would kill tra- ditional technologies and workplaces faster than modern workplaces can be created. According to McRobie (1979) the essence of Schumacher's ideas on intermediate technology is that the increasingly complex and costly technolo- gies of rich countries are generally inappropriate for the poor, and that the choice of technologies is the most critical choice confronting any de- veloping country. He distinguishes science and technology: The knowledge of scientific laws...is, in a sense, absolute, and one could hardly talk of intermedi-