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1.2. Why use concurrency?

There are two main reasons to use concurrency in an application: separation of concerns and performance. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that they’re pretty much the only reasons to use concurrency; anything else boils down to one or the other (or maybe even both) when you look hard enough (well, except for reasons like “because I want to”).

1.2.1. Using concurrency for separation of concerns

Separation of concerns is almost always a good idea when writing software; by grouping related bits of code together and keeping unrelated bits of code apart, you can make your programs easier to understand and test, and thus less likely to contain bugs. You can use concurrency to separate distinct areas of functionality, even when the operations in these distinct areas need to happen at the same time; without the explicit use of concurrency you either have to write a task-switching framework or actively make calls to unrelated areas of code during an operation.


  

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