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Chapter 13 - Acoustics of Buildings and ... > 13.7 - Factors Affecting Architectur...

13.7 Factors affecting architectural acoustics and their remedies

In an acoustically good hall, every syllable or musical note reaches an audible level of loudness at every point in the hall and then quickly dies away to make place for the next syllable. Any deviation from this makes the hall acoustically defective. Architectural acoustics depends on the volume of the hall and the surface materials such as chairs and curtains that are present inside. Some of the factors that affect the architectural acoustics are given below.

(i) Reverberation: Large reverberation causes overlapping of successive sounds, this causes loss in clarity of hearing. On the other hand, low reverberation causes inadequate loudness. Reverberation determines the speed of sound decay in a hall. A very short reverberation time makes a room dead. Thus the time of reverberation for a hall should neither be too large nor too small, it must have a definite value that satisfies the speaker and the audience. This is known as optimum reverberation. Practically, it was found that the time of reverberation depends on size of the hall, loudness of sound and the type of sound [speech or music] in the hall. For music, reverberation adds to the fullness of tone, blended sound and richness of bass frequencies. The optimu....


  

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