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Key Terms

/proc/cpuinfo—The directory that contains information on current CPU setup on the system.

/proc/dma—The directory that contains information on current direct memory access assignments on the system.

/proc/interrupts—The directory that contains information on current Interrupt Request assignments on the system.

/proc/ioports—The directory that contains information on current Input/Output address assignments on the system.

/proc/meminfo—The directory that contains information on the current memory usage situation, both physical and virtual, on the system.

/proc/modules—The directory that contains information on what modules are currently incorporated into the kernel.

Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)—A standard that allows an operating system the ability to control when power is supplied to peripheral components.

Advanced Power Management (APM)—A standard that allows a computer BIOS the ability to control when power is supplied to peripheral components.

burning—The process of writing information to a CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-R, or DVD-RW.

complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)—A memory store on the mainboard used to store configuration information for use during the boot process; not a true ROM chip, it requires a low level flow of electricity from an onboard battery to maintain the memory store.

direct memory access (DMA)—A channel that allows a hardware device direct access to physical memory.

disk imaging software—The software that is used to make identical copies of hard drives or hard drive partitions.

disk mirroring—A RAID configuration, also known as RAID 1, that consists of two identical hard disks, which are written to in parallel with the same information to ensure fault tolerance.

disk striping—A RAID configuration, a type of RAID 0, which is used to write separate information to different hard disks to speed up access time.

disk striping with parity—A RAID configuration, also known as RAID 5, that is used to write separate information to hard disks to speed up access time, and also contains parity information to ensure fault tolerance.

fault tolerant—A device that exhibits a minimum of downtime in the event of a failure.

File Transfer Protocol (FTP)—The most common protocol used to transfer files across the Internet.

Grand Unified Bootloader (GRUB)—A program used to boot the Linux operating system.

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)—The underlying protocol used to transfer information over the Internet.

Input/Output (I/O) address—An address in physical memory that is used by a particular hardware device.

installation log files—The files created at installation to record actions that occurred or failed during the installation process.

Interrupt Request (IRQ)—A method of sharing processor time used by the processor to prioritize simultaneous requests for service from peripheral devices.

International Standards Organization (ISO) images—The large, single files that are exact copies of the information contained on a CD-ROM or DVD.

Kickstart Configurator—A graphical utility that can be used to create a kickstart file.

kickstart file—A file that can be specified at the beginning of a Red Hat Fedora Linux installation to automate the installation process.

LInux LOader (LILO)—A program used to boot the Linux operating system.

Logical Unit Number (LUN)—A unique identifier for each device attached to any given node in a SCSI chain.

Network File System (NFS)—A distributed filesystem developed by Sun Microsystems that allows computers of differing types to access files shared on the network.

overclocked—A CPU that runs at a higher clock speed than it has been rated for.

Plug-and-Play (PnP)—The process of automatically allowing devices to be assigned required IRQ, I/O address, and DMA information by the system BIOS.

polling—The act of querying devices to see if they have services that need to be run.

Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID)—The process of combining the storage space of several hard disk drives into one larger, logical storage unit.

SCSI ID—A number that uniquely identifies and prioritizes devices attached to a SCSI controller.

spanning—A type of RAID level 0 that allows two or more devices to be represented as a single large volume.

target IDSee also SCSI ID.

terminator—A device used to terminate an electrical conduction medium to absorb the transmitted signal and prevent signal bounce.


  

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