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Chapter 4. Managing System Services > Configuring Log Files

4.3. Configuring Log Files

Linux maintains log files that record various key details about Linux operation. Using these log files is described later, in "Using Log Files." You may be able to begin using log files immediately, but knowing how to change the log file configuration can also be important. You do this by configuring the syslogd daemon, although some servers and other programs perform their own logging and so must be configured independently. You may even want to configure one computer to send its log files to another system as a security measure. You should also be aware of issues surrounding log file rotation; if your computer doesn't properly manage existing log files, they can grow to consume all available disk space on the partition on which they're stored.

4.3.1. Understanding syslogd

Most Linux systems employ a special daemon to handle log maintenance in a unified way. The traditional Linux system logger is syslogd, which is often installed from a package called sysklogd. The syslogd daemon handles messages from servers and other user-mode programs; it's usually paired with a daemon called klogd, which handles kernel messages and is usually installed from the same sysklogd package as syslogd.


  

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