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Subnetting Basics

In Chapter 7, “IP Addressing,” you learned how to define and find the valid host ranges used in a Class A, Class B, or Class C network address by turning the host bits all off and then all on. This is very good, but here’s the catch: You were defining only one network. What would happen if you wanted to take one network address and create six networks from it? You would have to do something called subnetting, because that’s what allows you to take one larger network and break it into a bunch of smaller networks.

There are loads of reasons in favor of subnetting, including the following benefits:

Reduced network traffic We all appreciate less traffic of any kind. With networks, it’s no different. Without trusty routers, packet traffic could grind the entire network down to a near standstill. With routers, most traffic will stay on the local network; only packets destined for other networks will pass through the router. Routers create broadcast domains. The more broadcast domains you create, the smaller the broadcast domains are and the less network traffic is on each network segment.


  

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