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1.1. PERCEPTION

SDRs sense specific radio bands but lack broad RF, audio, and visual perception. Perception technologies enable AACR to autonomously take the user's perspective, to understand referents in speech and vision, recognizing QoI features of both RF and user sensor-perception domains with a goal of zero redundant instructions from the user to the AACR for information access. The iCR accesses information as presciently as the legendary Radar O'Riley of 4077 MASH®.

1.1.1. RF Perception

RF perception goes beyond the detection of expected signals on known frequencies. It includes the extraction of helpful information from broadcast channels, deference to legacy (noncognitive) radios, reduction of noise, and minimization of interference not just by running the right SDR modules, but by autonomously constructing the RF behavior most appropriate to the setting. RF perception enables the iCR to characterize the significant entities and relationships in the RF environment. RF perception goes beyond the traditional radio-domain sensing of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), bit error rate (BER), code space, and the like. For example, to be most effective in the recently liberalized U.S. TV spectrum bands, an AACR not only senses broadcast channels but also computes the likelihood of hidden legacy TV receivers ("hidden nodes"), for example, based on detection of the TV below the noise level [3], directing energy away from hidden nodes.[] Such RF perception grounds the iCR's <Self/> with its <User/> in the domain (space × time × RF). The iCR's computational models of RF entities include legacy transmitters, aware—adaptive radios (AARs), iCRs, multipath reflectors, sources of noise or interference, and other relevant entities. The continuously increasing digital hardware capacity per gram enables increased wearable sensing with embedded RF scene perception from algorithms that model RF relationships. Thus, spectrum sharing of TV channels can evolve toward the iCR "radio etiquette," autonomous polite use of available radio resources tailored to the situation.

[] This comment relates to an important use case supporting FCC policy referred to as the TV-spectrum use case.


  

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