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Chapter 1. Setting Up Your Windows Home ... > Handling Multiple Network Subnets

Handling Multiple Network Subnets

By default, Windows Home Server assumes that all the computers on your home network lie within the same subnet, which is a subsection of a network that uses related IP addresses. For example, suppose that your Windows Home Server computer uses the IP address 192.168.1.254 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. This means that the subnet that Windows Home Server can “see” is the IP address range 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254. Working from client to server, any computer on your network that has an IP address within that range can therefore “see” Windows Home Server and connect to it. Windows Home Server allows this because its Windows Firewall is configured to allow only traffic that comes from the local subnet.

This works fine in the majority of home networks. However, you may have clients on your network that aren’t on the same subnet as Windows Home Server. For example, you might have clients that use IP addresses in the range 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254. (The default address in some routers is 192.168.0.1, so if you have clients that get IP addresses assigned from that router, the addresses will be in the 192.168.0.x subnet.) This represents a different subnet, so those clients might not be able to see Windows Home Server or connect to it.


  

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