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13. Networking > 13.4. ADSL

ADSL

The 64-Kbps rate that ISDN supports is nice, but if you want to access multimedia files via the Internet or simply are using the Internet a lot, you may want even more bandwidth. Without drawing additional cables to your house or office, ADSL (Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line), a variant of DSL (Digital Subscriber Line), is a convenient alternative that gives you up to 128 times (depending on your provider and your type of subscription) the bandwidth of standard dial-up access and is run via your ordinary telephone line. A drawback with ADSL is that it only works within a distance of about 5 to 8 kilometers (3 to 5 miles), depending on cable quality around the next switching station, which makes this service unavailable in rural areas. Typical bandwidths are 0.5 to 8 Mbps (megabits per second) downstream (to your computer—download operations, including viewing web pages and retrieving email) and 0.125 to 1 Mbps upstream (from your computer—upload operations, including sending email). Note that there are other technologies with similar-sounding names, such as SDSL. Although these are fundamentally different on the wire level, setting them up on your Linux box should be no different from ADSL.


  

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