Free Trial

Safari Books Online is a digital library providing on-demand subscription access to thousands of learning resources.

  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments

In considering the variety of people who’ve contributed directly or indirectly to the development of the book, its seems to me that most fall into any of three categories: those who introduced me to the world of SAP and SAP SCM, those who taught me SAP products including SAP SCM, and those who in one way or another helped directly in bringing about this book. Considering the first, I should express thanks to Mark Zinsli, who, back in 1996, long before it ever was really relevant to my job role, allowed me to take courses in SAP R/3 architecture, data models, and ABAP programming. I must further thank Janet Kerby, who deserves credit for bringing me officially into the world of SAP, “under false pretenses,” as she artfully puts it. Thanks, too, to Bob St. Louis for the early seeding of this book by exposing me to the state-of-the-art research at a time when APO was probably still just a glimmer in SAP’s eye.

As regards those who have at one time or another taught me something of the uses of SAP products, particularly planning products, here I know for sure that I’ll go amiss as there are simply too many to remember, let alone mention. Thanks to Peter Kaiser, my very first SAP instructor. Thanks to David Wiley and Gautam Bhattacharya, my very first APO instructors. Thanks also to Bharad Wuppalapati and Steve Blair, who, though never formal instructors, brought me to pace on master production scheduling and materials requirements planning. Hilmer Hintz deserves mention as hands down the best SNP and PP/DS instructor one could ask for, which, as someone who took each class two or three times, I feel well qualified to assess. And among that wide variety of people who never taught a course (at least for me) but who at one time or another engaged with me on one feature or another of SCM that increased my knowledge with bits and pieces that may have found their way into this book, thanks go to Justin Weyand, Chak Tongsak, Jennifer Newman, Rammohan Basineni, Michael Hawkins, Brian Lyles, Tajinder Singh, Chandrasekhar Reddy, Sunil Chebiyam, RJ Ramirez, Bryce Duck, Anupama Velayudhan, and my intro-to-SCM co-instructor, Kamlesh Porwal.

Finally, there are several who provided direct support to critical tasks, decisions, and approvals that led to the production of this book. Thanks first to Steven Miller for the early managerial endorsement, and later to Carl Muppaneni, who inherited me. Exact etymological history is unknown but somewhere between Steven Miller and Steve Blair there lies credit for perhaps one of the most critical pieces of advice found in this text: the “98% solution” in Chapter 4. Thanks many times over to my editor, Sheck Cho, who believed in the project and who exercised mythical patience while obstacles of familial crises followed by byzantine organizational approval processes by no less than three companies and by my infrequent but often-enough writer’s block got in the way of expeditious authorial output. Thanks to Greg Valdez, without whose managerial imprimatur this project would never have gone forward; thanks to Robb Gordon, without whose legal shuttling this project would never have gotten off the ground; thanks to Joel Levin-son, without whose celestially timed intervention this project would have surely died an ignoble bureaucratic death; and thanks to Andrew Benton of SAP AG, without whose lawyerly approval from SAP this project would be but for naught. Thanks, of course, to Patara Yongvanich of SAP AG for connecting me with the critical and indispensable Ricardo Poli, also of latter company; and last but absolutely not least, thank you several times over to Ricardo (and all your agents and supporters at SAP Labs in Palo Alto) for being an excellent host while I surfed SAP systems for screenshots.

  • Safari Books Online
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint