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Chapter 2. Cloud Design Patterns and Use... > Typical Design Patterns and Use Case...

Typical Design Patterns and Use Cases

Chapter 1, “Cloud Computing Concepts,” discussed the standard definition of a cloud and, to some extent, explained why it is becoming such an important technology strand for both consumers and providers. From the viewpoint of the cloud service consumer, you should understand that cloud in all its service models (Infrastructure as a Service [IaaS], Platform as a Service [PaaS], and Software as a Service [SaaS]) should not be seen as a new service; it does not introduce any new design patterns or software by itself. Instead, it should be seen as a new way to consume compute, storage, network, and software resources in a much more dynamic fashion. From the perspective of the cloud provider, cloud service models offer a new way for the provider to offer a well-defined solution in a more dynamic manner and bill or charge for these services based on their consumption. This, in turn, allows the consumers of these services to implement different business models for their products and the way they use IT.

Think about an example from the perspective of the consumer. Consumer A wants to deploy a service to host content, whatever that might be. He can buy it as part of a new hosting contract where he is simply given a space to upload files and manage the content and charged on a monthly basis for that space. Changes to that content can happen in real time; however, if for example, the consumer needed to add server-side processing or a backend database to persist data, he might have to wait several days for his provider to revise the contract to add this to his current service. In this example, you as a service consumer will be charged regardless of the activity of the web server, and you will typically enter into a contract that requires you to pay for six months to a year.


  

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