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4. Develop module image editing > Easing the workflow

Easing the workflow

Making virtual copies

In addition to making snapshot versions, you can create virtual copies of your master photos by going to the Library module and choosing Photo Image Create Virtual Copy (Image [Mac] or (Image [PC]). This creates a virtual copy version of the master image that is automatically grouped in a stack with the master photo (see Figures 4.105 and 4.106). As the name suggests, you are making a proxy version of the master. It may look and behave like a separate photo but it is in fact a virtual representation of the master and you can continue to edit in Lightroom as if it were a normal image.

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Figure 4.105. Virtual copy images are automatically stacked with the master file. When viewing the Library Grid view or filmstrip, you can tell which images are virtual copies by the turned-page badge in the bottom-left corner.

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Figure 4.106. As you make new virtual copies of a master file, these are automatically stacked with the original master image.

So what is the difference between a virtual copy and a snapshot? Well, a snapshot is a saved history state that’s a variation of the master. You have the advantage of being able to synchronize specific edit adjustments across all the snapshot versions but lack the potential to create multiple versions as distinct entities that behave as if they were actual copies of the master image. A virtual copy is therefore like an independent snapshot image, because when you create a virtual copy, you have more freedom to apply different types of edits and preview these edits as separate image versions. You could, for example, create various black-and-white renderings and experiment with alternative crops on each virtual copy version. Figure 4.107 shows how you might use the Compare view mode to compare virtual copy versions of a photo alongside the master version (or you could use the Survey view to compare multiple versions at once). Virtual copies also make it possible for you to create collections that have different settings. For example, you could use the Create Virtual Copy command to create black-and-white versions as well as colorized versions from a master image, and then segregate these virtual copies into separate collections.

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Figure 4.107. One of the advantages of having virtual copy versions of a master file is that you can explore applying different Develop settings and compare these against the original master.

You also have the freedom to modify the metadata in individual virtual copy images. For example, you may want to modify and remove certain metadata from a virtual copy version so that when you create an export from the virtual copy, you can control which metadata items are visible in the exported file. Let’s say you are running a location scouting service and send out images to clients that show the properties you recommend as photographic locations. You would normally store all the relevant metadata about the location such as the address and zip code, but you would want to remove such commercially sensitive information when distributing these photos to prospective clients.

Making a virtual copy the new master

Once you have created one or more virtual copies, you can then choose the Photo Image Set Copy as Master command to make any virtual copy version of an image become the new master version (and make the old master version become a virtual copy).

Synchronizing Develop settings

Now that we have covered all the main Develop controls, let’s now look at ways the Develop settings can be applied to multiple images. Whenever you have a selection of images active, the Previous button changes to show Sync... (Figure 4.108). Clicking this button allows you to synchronize the develop settings across two or more photos, based on the settings in the target (most selected) photo. In Figure 4.109, a number of photos had been selected in the filmstrip and if I were to click the Sync... button, this would open the Synchronize Settings dialog shown in Figure 4.110, where you can decide which settings are to be synchronized. Or, you can use the Image (Mac) or Image (PC) keyboard shortcut to open this dialog. If you click Check All, everything will be checked. If you click Check None, you can then choose any subset of synchronization settings. Whether you choose to save everything or just a subset of settings, this will have important consequences for how the photos are synchronized. If you choose Check All, everything in the selected image will be synchronized. In some cases this might well be the easiest and most practical option. But you won’t necessarily always want to synchronize everything across all the selected photos. Sometimes you need to think carefully about which specific settings you should synchronize. If not, you may end up overwriting settings that should have been left as they were (although you can always recover a previous image version via the History panel on an image-by-image basis). For example, if your imported photos have the Camera Default settings applied for Sharpening, Noise Reduction, and Calibration, you will want to be careful not to overwrite these settings. The sync behavior can also be critically affected by the process version of the most selected and other photos (see sidebar). Note that if If you hold down the Image key, the Sync button loses the ellipsis, and clicking the button now bypasses the Synchronize Settings dialog and applies a synchronization based on the last used Synchronize settings. Also in this mode you’ll see a Set Default... button. This allows you to set the current Develop settings as the new default settings for files shot with this particular camera plus this specific serial number and ISO setting. Note that what gets set here all depends on how the preferences have been configured (see page 327).

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Figure 4.108. When more than one photo is selected via the filmstrip, clicking the Sync... button (top) lets you synchronize images in that selection via the Synchronize Settings dialog. When you hold down the Image key, the ellipsis disappears (middle), and clicking this button bypasses the Synchronize Settings dialog and uses the last used Synchronize settings to synchronize the selected photos. Finally, you can hold down the Image key (Mac) or Image key (PC) to switch to the Auto Sync mode (bottom).

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Figure 4.109. The Develop settings in the most selected photo can be synchronized with all the other photos in a selection by clicking the Sync... button. The selected photos in the filmstrip are indicated with a gray surround, and the most selected photo is the one with the lightest gray color (and also the one displayed in the Navigator panel).

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Figure 4.110. In the Synchronize Settings dialog, use the Check All settings option with caution, since synchronizing everything may overwrite important Develop settings in the selected photos.


Note

Whenever you choose to synchronize the develop settings, Lightroom checks the process version status of the most selected image when deciding what to do. If the Process Version box is checked, it applies the process version of the most selected photo to all the other photos (if the selected photos already share the same process version as the most selected photo, no conversion needs to take place). If the Process Version box isn’t checked, things can become more unpredictable. In this situation the process version will not be referenced when making a synchronization. Therefore, if you attempt to synchronize Process 2003 settings to Process 2012 images, settings like Recovery or Fill Light won’t be translated. Similarly, if you try to synchronize a Process 2012 image to Process 2003/2010 photos, adjustments such as Highlights and Shadows won’t be recognized either.


Auto Sync mode

If you Image –click (Mac) or Image –click (PC) the Sync... button, it switches to Auto Sync mode and stays as such until you click the Auto Sync button to revert back to Sync mode again. You will notice there is a switch next to the left of these buttons. Clicking this has the same effect as switching you to Auto Sync mode, or you can use the Image (Mac) or Image (PC) keyboard shortcut. In Auto Sync mode you first make a selection of photos, and as you adjust the Develop settings for the most selected image, you’ll see these adjustments propagated across all the images in the selection. Auto Sync therefore behaves a bit like a Quick Develop panel mode for the Develop module. Lastly, there is the Reset button, which can be used to reset photos back to their Lightroom default settings.


Tip

When clicking the Check All button you may want to think carefully about synchronizing things like the local adjustments and Spot Removal settings. For example, synchronizing the Spot Removal settings could be beneficial if you are syncing a selection of matching shots in which you want to remove sensor dust marks that always appear in the same spot and the individual pictures don’t vary too much. But if all the pictures are shots of different subjects, sharing the Spot Removal settings would just create a big mess (in addition to overwriting any spotting work you had done already).


Lightroom and Camera Raw

As you are probably aware, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw (as part of the Adobe Photoshop program) both share the same Camera Raw processing engine. This means that any development adjustments that are applied in one program can be recognized and read by the other. However, there are a few things you need to bear in mind here. Camera Raw development is linked to specific versions of Photoshop. At the time of this writing, I anticipate that the launch of Lightroom 4.0 will coincide with a Camera Raw 6.7 update for Photoshop CS5. This will allow Photoshop CS5 users to open images processed in Lightroom 4 using Process 2012 and render such files in Photoshop. But because Process 2012 has completely new Basic panel controls you won’t be able to actually edit Process 2012 images using Camera Raw 6.7; it will just open them. Meanwhile, Photoshop CS4 users will have been provided with a Camera Raw 5.7 update. Now, although Camera Raw 5.7 for Photoshop CS4 has the ability to read most Process 2003/2010 edits, no further functionality was added to this particular version of Camera Raw for Photoshop CS4. Camera Raw 5.7 does enable the auto demosaicing that was new to Process 2010 and it can read all the Camera Raw settings that were effectively new to Camera Raw 6, including those specific to Process Version 2010. You just can’t edit those new settings and can’t use Camera Raw 5.7 to update from Process Version 2003 to 2010. All you can do if using Camera Raw 5.7 for Photoshop CS4 is read Process 2003 and Process 2010 images and edit Process 2003 images only. You definitely won’t be able to read or edit Process 2012 images using Camera Raw 5.7.


Note

To access the latest version of Camera Raw for Photoshop and Bridge, go to the Adobe website: http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/extend.html.



Tip

Instead of opening your images in Photoshop, you can always consider purchasing Adobe Photoshop Elements as a companion application to Lightroom. Elements contains nearly all the features found in Photoshop and uses the same underlying image processing engine. The main limitations are that you can’t edit or convert files to CMYK. As regards the raw processing, the latest version of Elements will include the latest version of Camera Raw. So if a Photoshop purchase or upgrade seems out of reach, you might want to consider Elements as an alternative.


If we return now to the current Lightroom/Photoshop status, if you want Camera Raw to allow the same full editing as you have in Lightroom 4, you will at some point need to upgrade to Photoshop CS6. However, the Camera Raw 6.7 update will offer some limited compatibility between the two programs.

Viewing Lightroom edits in Camera Raw

The main point to remember is to always save the metadata edits out to the files’ XMP space if you need Camera Raw to read the develop adjustments that have been applied in Lightroom. If you don’t do this, the edit changes you make in Lightroom cannot be read by Camera Raw (but do take note of the above points regarding Camera Raw and Lightroom compatibility).

Viewing Camera Raw edits in Lightroom

If you want your Camera Raw edits to be visible in Lightroom, you need to make sure that the image adjustments applied in Camera Raw are also saved to the file’s XMP space. To do this, launch Bridge and choose Camera Raw Preferences from the Bridge menu. This opens the dialog shown in Figure 4.111, where you need to select “Sidecar .xmp files” from the “Save image settings in” menu.

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Figure 4.111. To keep the Camera Raw edits in sync with Lightroom, you need to make sure that the Camera Raw settings are always saved to the sidecar .xmp files.

Keeping Lightroom edits in sync

If Lightroom detects that a file’s metadata has been edited externally, it should display a metadata status conflict warning badge in the thumbnail cell (Figure 4.112). Clicking this badge opens the dialog shown in Figure 4.113. If you see no warning but have good reason to believe that the metadata has been updated, then choose Metadata Image Read Metadata from files (in the Library module), or Photo Image Read Metadata from file (in the Develop module). Alternatively, choose Library Image Synchronize Folder (Figure 4.114). The Synchronize Folder command also runs a quick check to make sure that everything is in sync between Lightroom and any edit changes that may have been applied externally.

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Figure 4.112. When there is a metadata status conflict due to a photo’s metadata having been edited externally, you’ll see an exclamation point or upward arrow badge warning. This is assuming that you have the Unsaved Metadata option checked in the Library View: Grid View options (see page 116).

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Figure 4.113. The metadata status change warning dialog.

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Figure 4.114. The Synchronize Folder command can run a quick scan for updates.


Note

If the Unsaved Metadata option is checked in the Library View: Grid View options and you have unsaved metadata changes in Lightroom, you will see a downward arrow in the top-right corner. If you have unsaved metadata changes in Lightroom and you also make external metadata changes you will see an exclamation point. If the metadata is up-to-date in Lightroom and you make external changes, you will see an upward arrow.


Synchronizing Lightroom with Camera Raw
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1. This shows a simple illustration of how to keep a set of photos in sync when switching between Lightroom and Camera Raw. This shows a selection of photos in Lightroom that, so far, have only the default settings applied.

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2. I opened the same photo selection in Camera Raw, optimized the settings, and synchronized these across all the selected photos.

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3. When I returned to Lightroom, the “out-of-sync” photos displayed a metadata status change warning icon with an exclamation mark, indicating a metadata conflict. I clicked the warning icon and then clicked the Import Settings from Disk button to import the Camera Raw adjusted settings into Lightroom.


Tip

If you don’t see a metadata status warning where there should be (this can happen), then choose Metadata Image Read metadata from file.


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4. The externally adjusted settings now appeared updated in Lightroom.

Copying and pasting develop settings

Another way to synchronize images is to copy and paste the develop settings from one photo to another using the Copy and Paste buttons in the Develop module (Figure 4.115). Alternatively, select a photo from the Library Grid or filmstrip and use Image (Mac) or Image (PC) to copy the settings. This opens the Copy Settings dialog shown in Figure 4.116, which allows you to specify the settings that you want to copy. Note that if you Image–click the Copy button, you can bypass this Copy Settings dialog completely. So if you had previously clicked the Check All button to check all the settings in the Copy Settings dialog, Image–clicking the Copy button will copy all settings without showing the dialog. Once you have copied the develop settings, you can select a photo or a selection of photos via the Library module Grid view or filmstrip and click the Paste button to apply the current copied settings (or use the Image [Mac] or Image [PC] shortcut).

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Figure 4.115. The Copy and Paste buttons are located in the bottom-left section of the Develop module.

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Figure 4.116. This shows the Copy Settings dialog where you can check the items you wish to copy.


Note

Whenever you copy the develop settings, Lightroom utilizes the Basic panel settings associated with the process version of the selected image, and Lightroom will automatically want to include the process version of the image in the copy settings. You can override this by disabling the Process Version box, but see the sidebar on page 310 for information about how Lightroom handles process version conflicts that might arise when the process version of the image you are pasting to doesn’t match that of the image you copied the settings from.


Applying a previous develop setting

As you navigate the filmstrip, Lightroom temporarily stores the develop settings for each photo you click on and thereby allows you to apply a previous develop setting to any photo. Note that when applying a previous develop setting there is no Copy Settings dialog. This is because a “Previous” setting simply applies all the develop settings from the previously selected photo. You can also use the Image (Mac) or Image (PC) shortcut to apply a previous setting.

If more than one photo is selected in the filmstrip, the Previous button will change to say Sync... If you wish to override this behavior you can do so by holding down the Image key, which reverts the button to the previous mode of operation. Lightroom then applies a copy of all the settings from the previously selected photo to the selected photos.


Note

Applying any of the default, shipping Lightroom presets will automatically update a photo to Process 2012.


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1. Whenever you select a photo in the filmstrip Lightroom automatically stores the Develop settings as a Copy All setting.

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2. If you then select another photo in the filmstrip and click the Previous button, this pastes all the Develop settings from the previously selected photo.

Saving Develop settings as presets

Copying and applying settings is useful in the short term, but if you create a setting that you are likely to reuse again, it is a good idea to save it as a preset. Figure 4.117 shows an expanded view of the Develop module Presets panel in which you can see a list of custom preset settings. The Lightroom Presets folder is installed with Lightroom and has enough presets to help get you started, but you can add your own presets by clicking the plus button at the top the Presets panel. This opens the New Develop Preset dialog shown in Figure 4.118, where you can choose which settings you want to include in the preset. When you have decided which settings to check, give the preset a name, choose a folder location to save the preset to, and click the Create button to add it as a new preset to the list. This can be useful for all sorts of reasons. For example, it is a tedious process accessing the different camera profiles listed in the Camera Calibration panel Profile drop-down menu. Rather than click through each one in turn to see what effect it has, why not create a Develop preset in which only the calibration setting is saved for each profile option? Do this and as you roll the mouse over the list of presets you get to see an instant preview in the Navigator panel, as shown in Figure 4.117.

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Figure 4.117. As you roll the cursor over the Presets list, the Navigator updates to show a quick preview of how the Preset settings will affect the image. You can update existing settings by holding down the Image key (Mac) or right-clicking (PC) to reveal a contextual menu for the presets (which also allows you to select a preset to apply in the Import dialog for the next time you do an import). Choose Delete or click the minus button to remove a selected preset from the list.

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Figure 4.118. In the New Develop Preset dialog, check the items you want to include in a preset, give the preset a name, and decide which folder to save the preset to. The process version of the current selected photo determines which Basic panel adjustments are displayed here. Note also the process version warning. It is important to appreciate how process versions affect the available settings and subsequent preset behavior.

Lightroom provides you with several preset folders containing some presets to get you started. By default, new presets are automatically placed in a folder called User Presets. But if you prefer, you can organize your presets into different folder groupings. For example, in Figure 4.119 I added a number of preset folders which always appear listed in alphabetical order in the Presets panel. To add a new folder to the Presets list, right-click anywhere inside the Presets folder to open a contextual menu like the one shown in Figure 4.119, and choose “New Folder,” which will open a New Folder dialog. Give the folder a name and it will appear added to the Presets list. You can now organize your presets by dragging them into the folders that you have just created.

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Figure 4.119. You can use the contextual menu to import new presets. If you have been sent a Develop preset or have just downloaded one, use the contextual menu shown here to select Import and then locate the preset (or presets) you wish to add. You can also use the above contextual menu to add a new folder to the Presets list.

Auto Tone preset adjustments

The Auto Tone option is potentially useful for those times when you want to include an Auto Tone adjustment as part of a preset. In some instances this might be considered useful because you can get Lightroom to combine an auto correction in combination with other types of Develop adjustments. On the other hand, because it can lead to different tone settings being applied to each image, this might not always produce the results you were after (even though the Auto Tone logic has continually been improved in Lightroom). So just be aware of this when you include Auto Tone in a saved Develop preset setting; the results you get may sometimes be unpredictable.

The art of creating Develop presets

Lightroom develop presets have proved incredibly popular. Lots of Lightroom users have gotten into sharing their preset creations. While it is possible to encapsulate a complete Develop module look in a single preset, it seems to me that the best way to use develop presets is to break them down into smaller chunks. In my experience the trick is to save as few settings as possible when you create a new preset. What we often see are develop presets where the creator checks too many boxes and ends up with a preset that adjusts not just the settings it needs to adjust, but other settings, too. In many cases it is not always obvious which settings a develop setting is meant to be altering, and applying the preset may overwrite settings that it shouldn’t. Or, the creator includes White Balance or Exposure settings that may have been relevant for the pictures the creator used to test the develop setting with, but are not necessarily suited for other people’s photographs (in the following section I have provided a quick guide on how to create neatly trimmed develop presets). More important, the new Process 2012 has had a significant impact on develop preset compatibility. However, if you apply a legacy preset to a Process 2012 image, the absence of a process version tag should mean such settings still translate okay to a Process 2012 image (except for those settings that are specific to Process 2003/2010, such as Fill Light). In Figure 4.118, where the Process Version box has been deliberately unchecked there is a reminder that you should include the process version when saving new settings.


Note

If the Process Version box is checked when you save a preset, the process version is included when applying the preset to other images. If the photos you apply a preset to share the same process version, no conversion will take place, but if they don’t share the same process version they will have to be converted.

If the Process Version box isn’t checked when you create a preset things become more unpredictable. In this situation the process version will not be referenced when applying the preset. Therefore, if you apply a Process 2003 preset to a Process 2012 image, settings such as Recovery or Fill Light won’t be translated. Similarly, if you apply a Process 2012 preset to a Process 2003/2010 photo, settings like Highlights and Shadows won’t be recognized either.


Creating a new Develop preset
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1. Here is a photograph that I had adjusted in the Develop module, where I wanted to save the current Develop settings as a new preset.


Tip

If you are looking for inspiration, visit Richard Earney’s Inside Lightroom site where there are many different presets that you can download and import into the Develop Presets panel: http://inside-lightroom.com/.


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2. I clicked the Presets panel’s plus icon to open the New Develop Preset dialog and checked only those settings that were relevant for this effect. I named this preset setting Muted Color Contrast and saved it to the Special effects folder.

Understanding how presets work

Even with a Develop setting like the one described opposite and discussed in Figure 4.120, it can get confusing. A Develop preset like this is doing several things at once. It is boosting the contrast, reducing the color vibrance, and applying a split tone color effect. Incorporating all these Develop adjustments into one preset has its disadvantages and can lead to messy situations like that described in Figure 4.121.

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Figure 4.120. This chart summarizes the outcome of the “Muted color contrast” develop preset adjustment. In the Final settings row, the green tick marks represent the settings that were adjusted in the original image version and that remained unaltered afterward. The black tick marks represent those settings that are new and have been changed. This illustrates what can be regarded as a “clean” preset—it only adjusts the settings that need to be adjusted. Note that the process version didn’t change as the preset process version matched that of the image.

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Figure 4.121. This chart shows you what can happen when you apply a series of Develop presets. In the Final settings row, the green tick marks represent the settings that were adjusted in the original image and remained unaltered at the end. The black tick marks again represent the settings that are new or have been changed. However, the red tick marks represent the settings that have changed cumulatively during the process of trying out different develop presets (but which were not meant to part of the last applied preset). What this highlights is the fact that when the “Infrared color effect” was applied as a develop setting, some of the other develop settings (that were not part of the “Infrared color effect”) had already been altered by the previously applied develop presets.


Tip

A safe way to work with develop presets is to apply a preset and then use Image (Mac) or Image (PC) to undo it before trying out another one.


How to prevent preset contamination

As I mentioned earlier, one way I like to work with presets is to trim them down so that each preset performs a discrete task, such as a black-and-white conversion or a split tone coloring effect. That way I find I have more options to combine different settings and prevent getting into a situation like the one shown in Figure 4.121 where the end result was a contaminated mess. For example, I may apply one preset to modify the contrast and another preset to apply a coloring effect. I then keep these stored in separate preset folders so that it is easy for me to locate all the presets that can be used for applying different black-and-white conversions or cross-processing effects. The Figure 4.122 chart summarizes the steps that are described over the next few pages. You will notice how I added a series of presets to build a combined effect. Therefore, when applying different split tone effects I can click on each of the presets in turn to see a full-screen view of what the end result will look like, without fear of messing up any of the settings that have been applied already.

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Figure 4.122. The alternative approach is to break the Develop presets down into smaller chunks so that you apply a sequence of Develop presets to build an effect. This chart summarizes the series of Develop preset steps that are applied in the step-by-step example that begins on the opposite page. The final setting does include lots of red tick marks where the settings have changed cumulatively, but this does not matter as much as in the Figure 4.121 example because the whole point is to build the settings up one step at a time. You will notice that I included here a *RESET Special Effects step. This preset is designed to cancel out previous preset settings and therefore acts like a “clear settings” button. To illustrate this I have used crosses to indicate that these items are returned to their default settings (the Process Version box must always be checked though).


Note

The preset names must be unique. You can’t have two separate presets called “Cool tone,” stored in separate folders.


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1. To begin with I tried out some tone adjustment presets and selected a Light Contrast tone curve preset to apply a moderate contrast boost to the original color version of this image.

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2. I also wanted to try out some special effect coloring presets, so I selected an “SFX-Cold tone” preset from my Effects preset folder. Should I wish to reset the preset settings used here and move on to try something different, I have included a RESET setting in each folder that I can use to reset the relevant sliders to zero.

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3. After resetting the “Cold tone” preset I applied a “B&W Infrared” preset to see what this preset setting would do to the image.

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4. Next I went to the Split Toning folder to try different split tone presets. Here, I selected the “ST-sepia” split tone effect.

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5. In the end I opted for the “ST-Cool” tone Split Tone preset and finished off by adding a “Burn Corners” preset from the Tone Adjustments folder.

Resetting the develop preset settings

I will end this section by elaborating a little more on the use of the reset preset settings such as the one referred to in Step 2. With the Develop preset folder structure I use here, I have added a preset to each folder that is named “*RESET.” This is a preset setting that undoes any of the presets that have been applied in that particular folder. In the case of the Black & White folder, I have a preset called “*RESET black & white” that switches from B&W to Color mode. I created it by selecting a photo in color mode and created a new preset in which I checked only the Treatment (Color) check box (as shown in Figure 4.123). For all the other preset folders I similarly created presets such as a *RESET Split Tone setting that uses zero Split Tone Saturation settings. The naming of these presets isn’t critical; I prefer to use all caps so that the reset presets stand out more and I place an asterisk at the beginning of the name so that the reset preset always appears listed first in each of the preset folders.

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Figure 4.123. Here is an example of a preset that I created for converting a B&W setting back to Color mode again. To do this, select any image that is in Color mode and save a preset with the Treatment (Color) box checked.

Don’t forget you can also use the Image (Mac) or Image (PC) shortcut to reset all the develop settings.

How to set default camera develop settings

If while you are working in the Develop module, you create a develop setting that you feel is suited to the processing requirements of a particular camera, you can go to the Develop module Develop menu and choose “Set Default Settings.” This opens the New Develop Preset dialog shown in Step 3, where you can click the Update to Current Settings button to update the default settings for the camera model listed in the same dialog. But if at the same time you have “Make defaults specific to camera serial number” and “Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting” checked in the Lightroom Presets preferences, clicking Update to Current Settings will make the default setting specific to the camera serial number and ISO setting. The combination of the Set Default Settings and Default Develop Settings preferences allow you to establish the default settings that are applied to all newly imported photos.


Tip

I generally prefer to save the camera default settings as shown here because it tends to work well for the cameras and lenses I shoot with. However, be warned that including “Enable Profile Corrections” in the Lens Corrections panel may cause incorrect profiles to be applied to some lenses. Also bear in mind the performance hit incurred when lens profile corrections are included.


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1. To create a default camera preset setting, first select a photo shot with a particular camera that is representative of how the camera performs at specific ISO setting. Then work on the photo in the Develop module to achieve the optimum sharpness and noise reduction to use as a suitable starting point for future image editing. In the Lens Corrections panel I would recommend checking “Enable Profile Corrections” and also “Remove Chromatic Aberrations.” In the Camera Calibration panel I would suggest checking to make sure that the Process Version is set to 2012 and the Adobe Standard profile is selected (which is the default setting anyway for newly imported photos—just make sure you don’t override this). In all the other panels it is essential that the sliders are at their default settings. This is especially important in the Basic panel, where the White Balance setting should be left set to “As Shot.”


Tip

Very often you will find that as you import pictures from a particular camera shot at a certain ISO speed, you end up needing to apply the same develop settings. For example, if you shoot with more than one digital camera you may want to create a custom camera calibration setting for each separate camera body. In addition to this, you may want to set different levels of noise reduction for specific ISO settings. You can do all this by creating camera default settings.


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2. Go to the Lightroom Presets preferences (Image [Mac] or Image [PC]) and make sure that “Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting” is checked. It is important that you do this before proceeding to the next step. You can also check “Make defaults specific to camera serial number” if you want the settings to be camera body specific.

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3. Now go back to the photo you worked on in Step 1 and choose Develop Image Set Default Settings. This opens the dialog shown here, where you need to click the “Update to Current Settings” button. Do this and Lightroom will automatically make this the default setting for all newly imported photos that match the same criteria of matching camera model, serial number, and ISO setting. But remember that you have only created what amounts to a default setting. If you were to choose a specific setting in the Import Photo dialog, or later apply a develop preset that included Detail, Lens Corrections, or Calibration panel subsettings, these would override the camera default settings.

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