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Chapter 11. Lighting the Frame > Lighting in the Studio

Lighting in the Studio

Earlier in the book I touched on the color of light when I talked about good times to shoot (Chapter 6, “Interacting with Your Subjects”) and how to properly set for white balance (Chapter 5, “Technically Speaking”). So you’ll recall that light is measured in kelvin. The cooler lights, the more bluish-white lights, are typically measured at over 5,000 kelvin. The warmest lights, in the color range of candlelight, are measured at around 1850 kelvin. Obviously, when you’re considering how to balance ambient light, it’s quite advantageous to think of the color of all the lights involved, not just the brightness of them.

If you are mixing tungsten light (around 3000k) with overcast daylight (around 6500k), for example, you have to pay attention to managing the balance of these two colors in a way that doesn’t leave your clients looking rather wonky, professionally speaking, of course. But if you are mixing light from your on-camera flash (around 5500k) with regular daylight (around 5000k), you have much less concern when it comes to bringing these two lights together in a visually pleasing way, which is why I often pair these two light sources together easily.


  

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