Free Trial

Safari Books Online is a digital library providing on-demand subscription access to thousands of learning resources.

  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part I: 2 × 2 THINKING > The Eight Archetypal Dilemmas

Chapter 3. The Eight Archetypal Dilemmas

Archetypes are deep, recurring patterns that help us to understand what is taking place at the observable, surface level of life. The value of archetypes lies in their applicability to everyday experience, rendering the mysterious interpretable and the mundane more essential. Carl Jung, the Swiss writer and psychiatrist, saw archetypes as universal truths, existing for all societies within a shared "collective unconscious." We don't so much create archetypes as invent stories that give a name and identity to them. Concepts such as hero, villain, virgin mother, and redemption exist in all societies, appearing locally with unique names and dramas.

Take apart any strategic dilemma, and you will find a basic struggle occurring between opposing forces—for example, Quality versus Speed, Time versus Money, Risk versus Reward. The archetypal dilemmas offer eight thematic groupings of common struggles. Each archetype is a response to a particular question or challenge. Answering that question is likely to take one down a particular road. For example, feeling torn between two choices is often a battle between one's reasoning side and one's emotions. The Head and Heart archetype outlines the essential nature of such crises. Change versus Stability is an entirely different balancing act, highlighting the need for adaptive behavior in all living systems.


  

You are currently reading a PREVIEW of this book.

                                                                                                                    

Get instant access to over $1 million worth of books and videos.

  

Start a Free 10-Day Trial


  
  • Safari Books Online
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint