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Chapter 4. Turning Business and IT Goals into Success Criteria

Chapter 4. Turning Business and IT Goals into Success Criteria

An unknown person said many years ago, “Some people dream of success, while others wake up and work hard at it.” I couldn't agree more! To gain the most benefit from your mySAP solutions in terms of increased performance and lowest TCO, the IT and Business teams must wake up and recognize that a certain amount of effort will be required both before and after Go-Live. This chapter works through the process of converting your solution vision into business and IT goals, followed by concrete methods of determining to what degree these goals have been met. Thus, we will first need to take a closer look at how to map the high-level “solution characteristics” ultimately desired of your SAP system (e.g., awesome performance, high availability, and low cost of ownership) into SAP system business and IT goals. In doing so, I will discuss what I consider to be the three primary stress-testing/performance-tuning methods, each focused on very different but equally valuable approaches to repeatable testing and tuning. In the same manner, I will then take a closer look at the various tool sets germane to each method. Likewise, I'll note why certain tools are better positioned than others for a particular testing type, especially in light of meeting a company's unique performance-related desires or goals. Finally, with goals and objectives nailed down, tempered by the realities of the most appropriate testing/tuning method and its requisite tool sets, I will wrap up the chapter by identifying and discussing quantifiable stress-testing success criteria—the criteria against which your testing results may be measured to verify you indeed have been successful in proving what you set out to prove. For example, concrete success criteria will prove to IT managers without a shadow of a doubt, and in a measurable way, that their new system is as truly “awesome” as they were told it would be, in terms of a defined set of performance metrics. Figure 4-1 illustrates a process flow for clarification.

Figure 4-1. A high-level overview helps explain how to translate your “eyes closed” solution vision and specific solution characteristics into business and IT goals, followed in turn by stress-testing/performance-tuning success criteria.



  

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