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5. EDP Catalog

5. EDP Catalog

With the foundation we built in the previous chapters, you’re ready to start investigating the first portion of the EDP Catalog presented in the remainder of this book. The first sixteen patterns presented are the four fundamental object-oriented programming patterns followed by the twelve method-call EDPs. You’ve been introduced to eleven of them so far, and there are five more for you to learn on your own from the included specifications.

The format used to write up a design pattern is fairly standardized. The first popular use was in the original Gang of Four (GoF) text [21], and I follow that form here. Each pattern is written in several sections, starting with the pattern’s name, so that we have something canonical to refer to it by. The Intent section explains the pattern’s purpose. Next, the Motivation section provides background on the problem this pattern solves, and then the Applicability section explains when it should (or should not) be used. A sample structure is provided next as both a UML diagram and, where appropriate, an expanded PINbox. This structure is not ever to be used as a rote recipe, remember, but only as an example. If you need to change the implementation and do so without altering the relationships you’re concerned with, then do it. The concepts will still be there.


  

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