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Chapter 2: Measuring the Impact of Socia... > CASE STUDY OF A GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZ... - Pg. 29

Measuring the Impact of Social Media Ahuja (2000) found that the type of social network, such as whether it is densely cohesive or has structural holes, differed in its impact de- pending on the organizational context: he states that "the basic conclusion that the impact of dif- ferent network attributes and positions can only be understood relative to a particular context" (pp. 450-451). This means that in the application of social networks to organizations, whether as social media to facilitate knowledge sharing and/ or to assess the impact of organizational changes on the flow of knowledge, the old adage of "one size does not fit all" applies. The context in which social media can be assessed is therefore comprised of three major components: 1. 2. Connections ­ knowing who to contact in order to carry out a professional task; Communications ­ knowing what major are cited). The consultation of Facebook and other social networking sites are also frowned upon. This situation is largely due to a lack of understanding of the different social media and their potential role in organizations. The first half of the term "social media" ­ namely, "social" ­ leads to a misunderstanding that lumps all such technologies into the "not for serious work" category. Although numerous case studies exist, including the CIA's use of Facebook (Bruce, 2007), the large major- ity of government departments remain staunchly unconvinced. The lack of penetration of social media into the public sector not only results in a great loss of potential productivity but also further alienates younger generations from joining this particular workforce. There have, however, been some small forays into social media that have served to propagate good success stories. The more successful imple- mentations are achieved, documented and pub-