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Chapter 3. Applying Collected Data > Taking Cues from Your Competitors' Content...

3.3. Taking Cues from Your Competitors' Content Structure

You may have a lot of great content on your Web site, but if it's jumbled and disorganized, the search engines might not figure out what searches it relates to. This is why you should consider content siloing, which is a way of organizing your Web site into subject themes by linking related pages together. Content siloing lets you funnel link equity to your landing pages, which reinforces to the search engines how relevant those pages are for their keywords. Linking is so important that it can override the actual content of the page. Siloing is comprised of two parts. One is internal linking and another relates to page and site architecture. Consider a good site map: one that, in a very detailed schematic, outlines the entire structure of a document. Siloing means that all the links on the Web site follow that outline exactly without any straying from topic to topic. Literally, the anchor text links do more to inform Google than the content in those pages. (Siloing is a big subject, with its own chapter devoted to it. See Book VI, Chapter 3 for the full scoop.)

Looking at the top-ranking competitors' Web sites, you can get some clues as to how they've organized their content. This can benefit you in two basic ways:


  

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