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Chapter 3. Billboard Design 101: Designi... > Make it obvious what’s clickable

Make it obvious what’s clickable

Since a large part of what people are doing on the Web is looking for the next thing to click, it’s important to make it obvious what’s clickable and what’s not.

For example, on Senator Orrin Hatch’s Home page[3] during his unsuccessful 2000 presidential bid, it wasn’t clear whether everything was click-able, or nothing was. There were 18 links on the page, but only two of them invited you to click by their appearance: a large button labeled “Click here to CONTRIBUTE!” and an underlined text link (“FULL STORY”).

[3] Orrin Hatch deserves at least a footnote in usability history, since he was—to the best of my knowledge—the first presidential candidate to make Web usability a campaign issue. In the first televised Republican candidates’ debate of the 2000 campaign, he told George W. Bush, “I have to say, Governor, in contrast to [your Web site], it’s easy to find everything on mine. [Chuckles.] It’s pretty tough to use yours! Yours is not user-friendly.” (His site was easier to use.)


  

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